October 18, 2013   9 notes

(The body of Pope Saint Pius V in his tomb at the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome.)

Born Michele Ghislieri on January 17, 1504 in Italy, he was elected to succeed Pope Pius IV on January 7, 1566 and took the name Pius V.  Pius V was crowned ten days later, on his 62nd birthday, and reigned as Pope until his death in Rome on May 1, 1572.  Among other achievements during his Papacy, Pius V is credited by Papal historians and Church researchers as developing the familiar white vestments worn by Supreme Pontiffs today.

Upon his death, Pope Pius V was succeeded by Pope Gregory XIII.  In 1672, Pope Clement XI beatified Pius V and he was canonized by Pope Clement XII on May 22, 1712.  Pope Saint Pius V is recognized as the patron saint of Malta’s capital city, Valletta, which was rebuilt and fortified with assistance from Pius V following the Great Siege of Malta by the Ottoman Turks.

Pope Saint Pius V and Pope Pius X (Papacy: 1903-1914; Canonized: 1954) are the only Roman Pontiffs to be canonized in the past 700 years.  They will be joined by the two newest Papal Saints, Pope John XXIII (Papacy: 1958-1963) and Pope John Paul II (1978-2005), on April 27, 2014.

July 29, 2013   3 notes
July 8, 2013   35 notes
Despite his relatively short Papacy (1958-1963) and the expectations that he would be a transitional, caretaker Pope due to his advanced age, Pope John XXIII was not only one of the most important and influential Popes in centuries, but one of the most beloved Pontiffs in the history of the Church.  Today, John XXIII — who will be canonized alongside Pope John Paul II and become Saint John XXIII later this year — is affectionately remembered as “the Good Pope” due to his genial manner and easy smile.
Pope John, one of fourteen children born to poor Italian sharecroppers, also had a wonderful, often playful, sense of humor that he wasn’t afraid to exhibit despite the solemnity of his position and his age (he was just shy of 78 years old when he was elected in the 1958 Conclave).  The Vatican Gardens were a place of meditation and solitude for John XXIII’s immediate predecessors.  Pope Pius XI often walked through the Gardens in an attempt to bolster his faltering health and the intensely serious Pope Pius XII pondered the troubles of a world at war while strolling through the Gardens.
Pope John XXIII put the Vatican Gardens to good use, as well.  The Good Pope requested that maintenance workers tinker with the sprinklers which were part of the irrigation system in the Gardens so that they could be triggered to spray jets of water at unsuspecting guests.  Many cardinals who were asked to take a stroll through the Gardens with Pope John XXIII returned to the Vatican drenched by his trick sprinklers.
The Good Pope’s successor, Pope Paul VI, did not continue the tradition.  He had the trick sprinklers fixed when he was elected to the Papacy following John XXIII’s death in 1963.

Despite his relatively short Papacy (1958-1963) and the expectations that he would be a transitional, caretaker Pope due to his advanced age, Pope John XXIII was not only one of the most important and influential Popes in centuries, but one of the most beloved Pontiffs in the history of the Church.  Today, John XXIII — who will be canonized alongside Pope John Paul II and become Saint John XXIII later this year — is affectionately remembered as “the Good Pope” due to his genial manner and easy smile.

Pope John, one of fourteen children born to poor Italian sharecroppers, also had a wonderful, often playful, sense of humor that he wasn’t afraid to exhibit despite the solemnity of his position and his age (he was just shy of 78 years old when he was elected in the 1958 Conclave).  The Vatican Gardens were a place of meditation and solitude for John XXIII’s immediate predecessors.  Pope Pius XI often walked through the Gardens in an attempt to bolster his faltering health and the intensely serious Pope Pius XII pondered the troubles of a world at war while strolling through the Gardens.

Pope John XXIII put the Vatican Gardens to good use, as well.  The Good Pope requested that maintenance workers tinker with the sprinklers which were part of the irrigation system in the Gardens so that they could be triggered to spray jets of water at unsuspecting guests.  Many cardinals who were asked to take a stroll through the Gardens with Pope John XXIII returned to the Vatican drenched by his trick sprinklers.

The Good Pope’s successor, Pope Paul VI, did not continue the tradition.  He had the trick sprinklers fixed when he was elected to the Papacy following John XXIII’s death in 1963.

June 15, 2013   2 notes

barbotrobot said: Follow up question: was "Dead Presidents always takes precedence" intentional wordplay?

No, I’m just unintentionally brilliant.

June 15, 2013   2 notes

barbotrobot said: Why aren't you updating all the time? I love Papal History so much I wrote a play called Infallibility about the Cadaver Synod and this has the potential to be my favorite tumblr of all time.

I really wish I had more time to update it, but Dead Presidents always takes precedence because it has way more followers and pays some of the bills.  I’ll definitely work harder at updating this one, though, because I love Papal History, as well.

May 7, 2013   2 notes
I have no story or interesting fact to share in this post.  I just wanted to note that Pope Alexander VII (reigned 1655-1667) definitely has the coolest facial hair of any Pope.  When looking at portraits, Alexander VII stands out amongst other 16th and 17th Century Popes, so that’s probably the only reason I noticed him.  Many of the other Popes of his time look EXACTLY the same — if you’re ever bored, check out the portraits of Julius III, Pius IV, St. Pius V, Gregory XIII, Urban VII, Leo XI, and Paul III to see if you can tell the differences between them.  It’s like playing that game that I know we all played as kids when thumbing through that Highlights magazine in the lobby of the doctor’s office.   
It’s also worth pointing out that I’d definitely use his birth name as my stage name if I were a porn star:  Fabio Chigi.  Best name ever.

I have no story or interesting fact to share in this post.  I just wanted to note that Pope Alexander VII (reigned 1655-1667) definitely has the coolest facial hair of any Pope.  When looking at portraits, Alexander VII stands out amongst other 16th and 17th Century Popes, so that’s probably the only reason I noticed him.  Many of the other Popes of his time look EXACTLY the same — if you’re ever bored, check out the portraits of Julius III, Pius IV, St. Pius V, Gregory XIII, Urban VII, Leo XI, and Paul III to see if you can tell the differences between them.  It’s like playing that game that I know we all played as kids when thumbing through that Highlights magazine in the lobby of the doctor’s office.   

It’s also worth pointing out that I’d definitely use his birth name as my stage name if I were a porn star:  Fabio Chigi.  Best name ever.

May 6, 2013   5 notes

The Papal Retirees

In February 2013, when he announced his stunning decision to resign the Papacy, Pope Benedict XVI became forever linked in history with Pope Saint Celestine V, who was the last Supreme Pontiff to voluntarily resign as Bishop of Rome when he stepped down in 1294.  

The shared connection over the rare act of a voluntarily Papal resignation seems like it would be the closest Benedict XVI and Saint Celestine V would ever get to one another considering they sat on St. Peter’s throne 700 years apart.  However, on April 28, 2009, Pope Benedict XVI visited Sulmona, Italy following an earthquake in nearby L’Aquila and took time to pray at the feet of Pope Saint Celestine V’s exhumed body (pictured above).  On July 4, 2010, Benedict XVI returned to Sulmona and venerated relics belonging to the 13th Century Saint whose footsteps he would later follow off of the Vatican’s altar and into a rare Papal retirement.  

August 9, 2012   2 notes

Pope Victor I

Pope Saint Victor I was the 14th Pope, serving from approximately 189 to 198 or 199, about 120 years after the death of Saint Peter.  While very little is known about many of the early Popes, we do know that Victor was the first Pope born in Africa.  Victor’s exact birthplace is not known, but the extreme northern coast of Africa — particularly present-day Tunisia and Libya — was a Roman province at the time.

Most historians believe that Pope Victor was born near the present-day city of Khoms, Libya, east of Tripoli.  Some believe that Victor was also the first black Pope and others believe he was of Berber descent, but the scant historical evidence doesn’t tell us any more than the fact that he was African-born.  Victor’s North African roots resulted in changes during his Papacy as he celebrated Mass in Latin while previous bishops of Rome had presided over Mass in Greek.  Victor was also the first Pope known to have direct contact with the imperial court and his efforts resulted in great strides for Christianity in the Roman Empire.

August 1, 2012   2 notes

Synodus Horrenda

Read — How there was a ghastly Trial once
Of a dead man by a live man, and both, Popes
— Robert Browning, The Ring and The Book

January/February 897
Basilica of St. John Lateran, Rome, Italy


Lambert II — King of Italy, Duke of Spoleto, and Holy Roman Emperor — felt betrayed by Formosus — 111th Pope of the Catholic Church, Bishop of Rome, and Successor to the throne of Saint Peter. 

Lambert, an Italian, had been crowned as King of Italy in 891 and co-ruler of the Holy Roman Empire (with his father Guido III) in 892 by a very reluctant and pro-Carolingian (pro-German) Pope Formosus.  Almost immediately after Lambert’s coronation, Formosus invited Germany’s Arnulf of Carinthia to Rome to relieve Lambert of his imperial crown.  Arnulf’s attempts to wrest the Holy Roman Empire from Lambert and his father failed in 893 and early 894.  In the fall of 894, Guido III died and Lambert traveled to Rome with his mother, Ageltrude, to receive Pope Formosus’s confirmation of his sole succession to the imperial crown.  When Formosus hesitated, he was imprisoned in Rome’s Castel Sant’Angelo by Lambert and Ageltrude.  In February 896, Arnulf finally fought his way into Rome, freed Pope Formosus, and received Formosus’s papal confirmation as Holy Roman Emperor.

Shortly after receiving Formosus’s blessing, Arnulf fell ill while marching on Spoleto to defeat Lambert and Ageltrude once and for all.  Due to Arnulf’s illness, the campaign against Lambert was canceled and Arnulf retreated home to Germany, weak in health and power.  Lambert regained power in Italy quickly and at the beginning of 897, he arrived in Rome to exact vengeance on Pope Formosus.  By using political pressure and military threats, Lambert called for an ecclesiastical trial of Pope Formosus inside the Basilica of St. John Lateran.  Pope Formosus sat silently on his pontifical throne, dressed in his papal vestments and tiara, and was given a defense lawyer who never argued for his client.  Formosus was charged with several violations of canon law and perjury and easily found guilty. 

Rome was shocked by the spectacle of the trial of Formosus and with good reason.  Throughout the trial, Formosus didn’t speak and he didn’t attempt to defend himself.  In fact, it was impossible for Formosus to speak or defend himself at his trial — not because it wasn’t allowed, but because of one very simple reason:  Pope Formosus had been dead for eight months.

On April 4, 896, just over a month after crowning Arnulf as Holy Roman Emperor in Rome, Pope Formosus fell ill and died, possibly after being poisoned.  He was quickly replaced by Boniface VI, but Boniface served as Pope for only 15 days before he also died.  Boniface was replaced in May 896 by Stephen VI — the candidate put forward and supported by the powerful Spoletan families aligned with Lambert II and Ageltrude.  Though Stephen VI received his appointment as Bishop from Formosus, he owed his power and pontificate to the powerful families of Spoleto, namely Lambert and Ageltrude.  When Lambert and his mother came to Rome in early 897, it did not take much pressure for Stephen VI to put his predecessor on trial.  Lambert accused Formosus of betraying Italy by inviting a barbarian King (Arnulf) to steal the imperial crown that Lambert felt rightfully belonged to him.  Pope Stephen VI therefore called for the decomposing body of Formosus to be exhumed from his tomb and dressed in his papal robes.  The papal tiara was placed on his rotting head and the corpse of Pope Formosus was seated on a throne in the Basilica of St. John Lateran to face his accusers, led by the current Pope, Stephen VI.

The great German historian Ferdinand Gregorovius breaks down the “Council of the Cadaver” far better than I could ever attempt to do justice:

Cardinals, bishops and many other ecclesiastical dignitaries gathered together in the Lateran basilica.  The corpse of the pope was taken from the sepulchre in which it had rested for several months and, clothed in papal vestments, was placed on a throne in the Council Chamber.  The lawyer of Pope Stephen stood up and, turning toward that horrendous mummy at whose side stood trembling a deacon who acted as the defender, notified to him the counts of the indictment.  Then the living pope demanded from the dead one, in mad fury:  ‘How could you in your insane ambition usurp the apostolic see, you who were already bishop of Portus?’  The attorney for Formosus mumbled something in his defense, as much as horror allowed him to say anything, then the cadaver was pronounced guilty and sentenced.  The synod signed the act of deposition, damned the pope for eternity and decreed that all those upon whom he had conferred holy orders would have to be ordained again.  The vestments were torn off the corpse, and the three fingers of the right hand, with which the Latins imparted benediction, were cut off.  Then with savage shouts the corpse was dragged out of the chamber, through the streets of Rome, and finally dumped in the Tiber in the midst of the yelling of an immense throng.”

What followed the Cadaver Synod is a mixture of history and legend that is sometimes difficult to navigate 1100 years later.  After his naked, mutilated corpse was dumped into the Tiber River, it washed ashore three days later and was collected by a monk who may have been the man who became Pope Theodore II for a short time at the end of 897.  Immediately following the end of the Synod, a powerful earthquake rocked Rome and destroyed the Lateran Basilica where Stephen VI had put Formosus on trial.  Many Romans took this as a divine signal that Pope Stephen VI had gone too far in desecrating the body of his predecessor and just a few months later, Stephen himself was imprisoned after a public uprising.  By August 897, Pope Stephen was dead — strangled in captivity in Castel Sant’Angelo.

The battles and intrigues of medieval popes continued for centuries, but Pope Theodore II and Pope John IX both held councils by the beginning of the 10th century that nullified the findings of Stephen VI’s Cadaver Synod.  However, Pope Sergius III, who served from 904-911, participated in the Cadaver Synod as a bishop and overturned the ruling of Theodore II and John IX, thereby confirming the findings of Stephen VI’s bizarre and macabre council.  In fact, Sergius III went as far as contributing a complimentary epitaph to the tomb of Stephen VI and some historians claim that Sergius III had Formosus re-exhumed, retried, re-convicted, and beheaded — although that is not universally agreed upon.  Sergius III, though, is not exactly high on the Vatican’s lists of “Greatest Popes” considering he ordered the murder of one Pope (Leo V) and illegitimately fathered another Pope (John XI). 

Today, all of these Popes are recognized as legitimate successors to Saint Peter’s throne by the Vatican, but it’s clear that when people say that the Catholic Church has some present-day issues that things were once much, much worse.